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Locate Available Clinical Trials

To view available Clinical Trial information choose from the list on the right or search using the fields below.

 

 

trial #
trial description
  • Alliance A081105
  • The purpose of this study is to compare any good and bad effects patients may have when treated with the standard treatment against patients who are treated with the standard treatment plus erlotinib (a research drug) for patients who have early stage non-small cell lung cancer that was surgically removed and may have been treated with chemotherapy and/or radiation.

  • Alliance A151216
  • The purpose of this research study is to examine lung cancer patients’ surgically removed tumors for certain genetic changes, and to possibly refer these patients to a treatment study with drugs that may specifically target tumors that have these genetic changes. 

  • CALGB 30610
  • The purpose of this study is to compare the effects, good and/or bad, of three different ways to give radiation therapy for limited small cell lung cancer. Two of the ways are research, while one of them is standard. The two research ways of giving the radiation therapy are (1) once a day (Monday through Friday) with a high dose of radiation for 7 weeks; or (2) once a day (Monday through Friday) for 16 days of treatment (about 3 weeks), followed by twice a day for the remaining 9 days of treatment (about 2 weeks), for a total of 5 weeks. The standard way of giving the radiation therapy is to give it twice a day (Monday through Friday) for 3 weeks. Everyone will get the chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide, which has been established through clinical trials to be standard drugs (chemotherapy) for this type of cancer.

  • CTSU EA5142
  • The purpose of this study is to find if adding the study drug, nivolumab (also known as OPVIDO®), will limit lung cancer from growing back in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer. Nivolumab is a drug that may turn on the body’s immune system to attack any cancer cells that may remain after surgery. The addition of nivolumab may help prevent your cancer from returning, but it could also cause side effects. This research study will allow researchers to find out whether this different treatment is better, the same, or worse than the usual treatment for lung cancer. The study drug, nivolumab, is already FDA-approved for use in non-small cell lung cancer that has previously been treated with chemotherapy. The use of nivolumab in this study is investigational (not approved by the FDA) in your type of cancer.

  • CTSU EA6141
  • The purpose of this research study is to compare any good and bad effects of giving ipilimumab, nivolumab, and GM-CSF (Sargramostim) at the same time compared to just ipilimumab and nivolumab together. We would also like to find out what effects, good and bad, that this combination of drugs may have on your cancer.

  • ECOG-ACRIN E4512
  • The purpose of this research study is to compare any good and bad effects of using the study drug, crizotinib (also known as XALKORI®), after completion of surgery and, in some cases, after chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy for ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer.

  • NRG BR001
  • NRG LU002
  • NRG/RTOG 1306
  • Cancer is a disease caused by alterations in the functions of genes within the cells. In approximately 15% of patients with non-small cell lung cancer, one of two genes is altered significantly (known as EGFR mutation or ALK rearrangement). Erlotinib, a pill, taken on a daily basis produces significant decrease in the size of tumors in patients with advanced stage lung cancer with EGFR mutation. Similarly, another pill, crizotinib, produces significant decrease in the size of tumors in patients with advanced stage lung cancer with ALK rearrangement. The purpose of this study is to find out what effects, good and/or bad, one of the treatments has on you and your locally advanced, non-operable lung cancer with specific gene alterations (EGFR mutation or ALK rearrangement).  

  • RTOG 1308
  • The purpose of this study is to compare the good and bad effects of these two different types of radiation therapy in combination with FDA-approved chemotherapy for your type of lung cancer. Compared with photons, proton therapy can stop shortly after penetrating through the tumor and therefore may cause less damage to the surrounding healthy organs. This feature of proton therapy may allow doctors to deliver higher doses of radiation to the tumor. 

  • SWOG S1206
  • The purpose of this study is to find out what effects, good and/or bad, a new combination of treatment has on you and your cancer. This study will be conducted in two parts. Patients will take part in either Part I or Part II, but not both.

    In the first part of the study, patients will be given the investigational drug veliparib in combination with the standard treatment of paclitaxel, carboplatin and radiation.  Veliparib is considered investigational because it has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of lung cancer.  The first part of the study is to find the appropriate dose of veliparib and to test the safety of giving it in combination with paclitaxel, carboplatin and radiation.  After completing six weeks of treatment with veliparib, paclitaxel, carboplatin and radiation, you will be evaluated by your study doctor.  If your tumor has not gotten worse, you will receive an additional two cycles (6 weeks) with the same combination of drugs (veliparib, paclitaxel, and carboplatin). 

    In the second part of the study, patients will be treated with the standard treatment of paclitaxel, carboplatin and radiation.  About half of the patients will also receive the investigational drug veliparib (at the dose as determined in the first part of the study).  The other half of patients will receive a placebo (a capsule containing no medication).

  • SWOG S1400
  • The purpose of this study is to compare several investigational agents to the usual treatment approach for squamous cell lung cancer that has progressed.  The investigational drug assigned will be based on tumor biomarkers.

     

  • SWOG S1403
  • The purpose of this study is to compare any good and bad effects of using afatinib along with cetuximab to using afatinib alone.  The addition of cetuximab to the usual afatinib could shrink your lung cancer, but it could also cause side effects.  This study will allow the researchers to know whether this different approach is better, the same, or worse than the usual approach.  

  • SWOG S1507
  • The purpose of this study is to test any good and bad effects of the combination of trametinib and docetaxel in patients with KRAS mutant lung cancer. Docetaxel is FDA-approved to treat your type of cancer but trametinib is not.  However, trametinib is FDA-approved to treat other cancers.  The combination of the two drugs is considered investigational.  These drugs could shrink your cancer by about one-third in size but they could also cause side effects. Researchers hope to learn if this combination will shrink cancer in at least 37% of patients.